Investing in oligopolies isn’t always a winning strategy

Everyone knows that market concentration leads to less competition and in turn to more powerful entities within this group. Such oligopolies by definition should allow the respective companies to achieving strong results and high margins due to pricing power, but also where applicable economies of scale. In reality, however, not every sector or company offers automatically a good stock investment, even when factually operating in an oligopoly.

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Checkmate – more kings to have on the radar for dividend cuts

My longer time readers know that dividend cuts have been one of my favorite topics. It is of high importance for me to ring the bell in order to help investors get more cautious with their investments. There are no risk-free stocks. The same applies to proclaimed “bond-proxy” dividend stocks, no matter which useless title they hold in connection with their dividend series. Today, I’m presenting two more kings I have on my radar for a cut.

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What most investors get wrong about gold stocks + new research report

There are three things the majority of investors fail to understand with regards to gold stocks. The first is gold is NOT THE hedge against inflation and thus gold stocks not even better hedges. The second is with higher gold prices, NOT ALL gold stocks go up exponentially. The third is the evergreen that all gold stocks are heavily undervalued by the stupid market and great buying opportunities. I am going to take these beliefs apart. My Premium PLUS members receive on top my best gold stock idea after I have already had a golden hand with my silver pick (for all my members). If you read until the end, I have a small gift for you.

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Why you should look out for Cannibals

My perception is the majority of stock investors do either prefer dividend stocks or something with a high growth component like first and foremost technology. The third group would be turnarounds (which I am also not opposed to). What is much under-appreciated, though, are cannibals or buyback monsters. I think this topic should earn more attention. Good for those who know about it.

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Buying companies after dividend cuts + new research report

What sounds crazy at first sight, indeed is rather an interesting strategy to think about. Sounds crazy, as almost everyone is talking about higher dividends? Let me make the case for dividend cuts! My next stock idea from my upcoming research report fits exactly into this scheme.

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Quitting at a loss to free up capital and the mind

Today, I’m writing about one of my (former) best stock ideas which didn’t play out as initially thought. Besides describing the case and the reason that led me to throw in the towel, I also want to use it to show why it’s important to regularly go over one’s portfolio and to cut the weeds.

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Why it makes no sense to copy Warren Buffett

This is a topic I’ve wanted to write about for a while. Those stock pickers who decide not to migrate to the camp of chartists, tee leaf readers or other witchcrafts, will likely join the group of value investors. In this context, the name of Warren Buffett must not miss. Many investors claim to emulate his strategy, others try to seek inspiration which stocks to buy. Today, I will show that both are delusions.

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Today’s tech-leaders… can stop existing tomorrow

Tech stocks, “Big Tech” or the “Magnificent Seven” – the same the names get more stupid, the riskier investing in their stocks becomes. Many do not see it this way. For the bona fide investor these are core investments of their portfolios with great future potential. However, a critical look back at history tells us that the risk / reward ratio is not favorable. Size does not equal safety.

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“Fallen Angels” – why you should be cautious + new research report

No matter whether experienced or not, almost every investor is on the hunt for undervalued stocks to make money. What could be less welcome than a stock which has fallen in price and become cheaper? The problem is, “cheap” is not automatically “cheap”. In fact, buying cheap can become a costly mistake. I see a strict urgency to clean up with this dangerous myth that a stock only has to fall enough to become attractive.

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